Thursday, 13 December 2012

Gary McKinnon spills the beans on UFOS


British hacker extraordinaire Gary McKinnon tells Wired News what he found while he was casually browsing around NASA classified files. This transcript is VERY interesting.

More after the jump:






Like a boss








The search for proof of the existence of UFOs landed Gary McKinnon in a world of trouble.
After allegedly hacking into NASA websites -- where he says he found images of what looked like extraterrestrial spaceships -- the 40-year-old Briton faces extradition to the United States from his North London home. If convicted, McKinnon could receive a 70-year prison term and up to $2 million in fines.
Final paperwork in the case is due this week, after which the British home secretary will rule on the extradition request.
McKinnon, whose extensive search through U.S. computer networks was allegedly conducted between February 2001 and March 2002, picked a particularly poor time to expose U.S. national security failings in light of the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.
McKinnon tells what he found and discusses the motivation behind his online adventures in this exclusive phone interview with Wired News.
Wired News: What was your motive or inspiration for carrying out your computer hacking? Was it the War Games movie?
Gary McKinnon: This is a bit of a red herring. I have seen it but I wasn't inspired by it. My main inspiration was The Hacker's Handbook by Hugo Cornwall. The first edition that I read was too full of information.... It had to be banned, and it was reissued without the sensitive stuff in it.
WN: Without this book would you have been able to do it?
McKinnon: I would have done it anyway because I used the internet to get useful information. The book just kick-started me. Hacking for me was just a means to an end.
WN: In what way?
McKinnon: I knew that governments suppressed antigravity, UFO-related technologies, free energy or what they call zero-point energy. This should not be kept hidden from the public when pensioners can't pay their fuel bills.
WN: Did you find anything in your search for evidence of UFOs?
McKinnon: Certainly did. There is The Disclosure Project. This is a book with 400 testimonials from everyone from air traffic controllers to those responsible for launching nuclear missiles. Very credible witnesses. They talk about reverse-(engineered) technology taken from captured or destroyed alien craft.
WN: Like the Roswell incident of 1947?
McKinnon: I assume that was the first and assume there have been others. These relied-upon people have given solid evidence.
WN: What sort of evidence?
McKinnon: A NASA photographic expert said that there was a Building 8 at Johnson Space Center where they regularly airbrushed out images of UFOs from the high-resolution satellite imaging. I logged on to NASA and was able to access this department. They had huge, high-resolution images stored in their picture files. They had filtered and unfiltered, or processed and unprocessed, files.
My dialup 56K connection was very slow trying to download one of these picture files. As this was happening, I had remote control of their desktop, and by adjusting it to 4-bit color and low screen resolution, I was able to briefly see one of these pictures. It was a silvery, cigar-shaped object with geodesic spheres on either side. There were no visible seams or riveting. There was no reference to the size of the object and the picture was taken presumably by a satellite looking down on it. The object didn't look manmade or anything like what we have created. Because I was using a Java application, I could only get a screenshot of the picture -- it did not go into my temporary internet files. At my crowning moment, someone at NASA discovered what I was doing and I was disconnected.
I also got access to Excel spreadsheets. One was titled "Non-Terrestrial Officers." It contained names and ranks of U.S. Air Force personnel who are not registered anywhere else. It also contained information about ship-to-ship transfers, but I've never seen the names of these ships noted anywhere else.
WN: Could this have been some sort of military strategy game or outline of hypothetical situations?
McKinnon: The military want to have military dominance of space. What I found could be a game -- it's hard to know for certain.
WN: Some say that you have given the UFO motivation for your hacking as a distraction from more nefarious activities.
McKinnon: I was looking before and after 9/11. If I had wanted to distract anyone, I would not have chosen ufology, as this opens me up to ridicule.
WN: Tell me about your experiences with law enforcement and the procedures you have gone through.
McKinnon: I was arrested by the British National Hi Tech Crime Unit in March 2002. They held me in custody for about six or seven hours. My own computer and ones I was fixing for other people were taken away. The other machines were eventually returned, but they kept my hard drive that was sent to the U.S. It was November 2002 when the U.S. Department of Justice started their efforts to extradite me.
WN: The British Crown Prosecution Service dropped charges against you because your activities did not involve British computers.
McKinnon: I was to be officially charged in 2003 but a warrant wasn't given until 2004.... In June or July 2005, I was scooped from the street by Scotland Yard. I was kept at Belgravia Police Station overnight. I just wore what I had on when I was out; I didn't get a chance to wear a suit in court. I was given police bail.
WN: When will they make a decision about extradition?
McKinnon: It's down to the Home Secretary, John Reid. The deadline for representations is 21 June 2006. Even after that date, it could be as much as 11 months for him to decide on my fate.
WN: How have you been coping?
McKinnon: God, it's very worrying and stressful. It's been worse because I'm unemployed. I worked on and off in IT, contracting and stuff, before this, but no one will touch me with a large barge pole now.



Now, this has left me in a pickle. If a was the Journalist I would have squeezed out every single ounce of information Gary was clearly holding back on, such as:

  • Non-terrestrial officers?
  • The disclosure project?

The mind boggles.

And it gets better still...













Truth Media Team.




Undeniable evidence that UFOS exist!



Well this is interesting. Join me after the jump:











Hmm. Well this is interesting.

As we can all see from this video, UFOS exist. End of. I mean how can could you possibly fake all these footages, right?

I think the icing on the cake is the Jerusalem footage, whereby there are four different angles and perspectives of the alien. I personally think that this is the real deal:










Now, If we accept the fact that aliens exist, then why have the government not disclosed full information on alien activity to the press? I've complied a few explanations:

  • Maybe there would be mass panic?
  • Maybe the aliens are forcing them to keep quiet. The man who was interviewed in the video implies that this maybe the case
  • Or maybe the governments are just lying deceitful c***s

I think its the latter.


But on a serious note, the man from the interview said that 'they' (presumably the aliens) wanted to keep the population low (500 Million anyone?), so this sounds bad. Real bad.


And on a final note, has this got anything to do with the impending doom of 2012? Its anyones guess really. We are just going to have to wait and find out gents.


Peace.


Truth Media Team.

Is it really the end of the World?

Courtesy of the Independent, have a look:




The end of the world is nigh, or so apocalypse observers would have you believe. The Mayan and Hopi Mesoamerican Long Count calendar may have begun in 3114BC and continued unerringly ever since, but it comes to an abrupt halt on 21 December 2012. Hence, the belief gaining ground among those who fall for this kind of thing that the cosmos will cease to exist in 12 days' time.

Although it may not yet have taken root in Britain's Acacia Avenues, the idea of an approaching cataclysm is troubling folk from Moscow to France, and the US to Brazil. The New York Times has reported that some spooked Russians have been panic-buying matches, fuel and sugar to prepare for the post-apocalypse. And they are not alone. A poll by Ipsos recently found that one in seven people believe the world will end during their lifetime (or, presumably, just after it). The same poll suggests that one in 10 people have experienced fear and/or anxiety about the eschatological implications of Friday week.
But reassurance is at hand. Governments around the world are taking the prophesied threat seriously enough to inform their citizens that they are not taking it seriously at all. Here in the United States, for example, an official government blog entry was posted on Monday, reassuring Americans that "Scary rumors about the world ending in 2012 are just rumors".
Nasa itself has waged a campaign of facts to combat the fear-mongering, releasing a 6.5-minute YouTube video, in which David Morrison, astronomer and Nasa scientist, personally debunked the Doomsday theories. Last month, the space agency published detailed rebuttals of five separate apocalyptic scenarios on its website, including a meteor strike, a solar flare and the so-called polar shift, whereby the Earth's magnetic and rotational poles would reverse, with devastating consequences. While magnetic reversals do take place approximately every 400,000 years, admits Nasa, "As far as we know, such a magnetic reversal doesn't cause any harm to life on Earth. Scientists believe a magnetic reversal is very unlikely to happen in the next few millennia."
A few days ago, the Australian Prime Minister, Julia Gillard, tackled the Mayan predictions in a spoof television appearance for the radio station Triple J. Acknowledging that "The end of the world is coming", she grimly intoned, "It turns out the Mayan calendar was true … Whether the final blow comes from flesh-eating zombies, demonic hell beasts or from the total triumph of K-Pop, if you know one thing about me, it's this: I will always fight for you to the very end." Some Australian commentators wondered aloud whether such a light-hearted intervention was becoming of the PM. In Russia, meanwhile, the Minister of Emergency Situations, Vladimir Puchkov, issued a statement insisting that the world would not end this month, a sentiment echoed by senior clerics from the nation's Orthodox Church.
Experts in Mayan culture – which flourished in what is now Central America between AD250 and 900 – have dismissed the doomsayers, claiming the 2012 phenomenon misrepresents the Long Count calendar, and is unsupported by any surviving Mayan texts. The internet, with its capacity for sustaining conspiracy theories, is thought to be to blame.
One such theory is the "Nibiru cataclysm", which posits that the Earth will collide with a planet by that name. The notion originated in the 1990s, with an American woman called Nancy Lieder, who claims she is a "contactee" with an implant in her brain that allows her to communicate with aliens from the Zeta Reticuli star system, 39 light years away. Ms Lieder, who has a website and a Twitter account, says she was chosen to warn mankind of the interplanetary danger that awaits us.
In South and Central America, where the original prophecy was allegedly made, responses are mixed. The mayor of the mountain town San Francisco de Paula, in the far south of Brazil, has urged local residents to stock up on supplies in preparation for the worst. But in Yucatan, Mexico, which still has a large Mayan population, a cultural festival is planned for 21 December. Any British people still concerned about the Long Count's conclusion could perhaps seek refuge in Bugarach, a tiny French village in the Pyrenean foothills, which the web has inexplicably agreed will be spared the ravages of Armageddon – possibly due to a nearby mountain, which resembles the alien landing site from Close Encounters of the Third Kind.
Or they could do what most of us do when our calendars run out: buy a new one.

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